Using E7 rates on E10 meter

Home Forums General discussion Using E7 rates on E10 meter

  • This topic has 26 replies, 15 voices, and was last updated 3 years ago by Kunal.
Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 27 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1838
    Kunal
    Participant

    Thanks Michael. Appreciate the advice.

    Kunal

    #1837
    Michael
    Participant

    Hi Kunal

    I would suggest giving together energy a call in say 4 weeks and explain you have had a meter change and they would be able to check the national database to see if the new meter details are uploaded before progressing with your switch, if they are not updated at the time of you call and this is still the case after 6 weeks contact eon and they would need to chase this up to get the database updated, make sure you ask them to record your call/email etc as a formal complaint if this happens as they have 8 weeks to sort it before you can escalate it to ombudsman services energy, it should be resolved before this is required in most cases but it also avoids any delay taking the matter to the ombudsman as you recorded it as a complaint from the start. If you have any more questions please don’t hesitate to contact us here.

    #1836
    Kunal
    Participant

    Thanks Michael,

    Would you suggest I wait for 6 weeks and then contact together energy and advise them I have an economy 10 meter?

    Kunal

    #1835
    Michael
    Participant

    Sorry I meant Kunal, damned autocorrect !

    #1834
    Michael
    Participant

    Hi Kumal, you would continue to receive 10 hours off peak electricity the same as with eon, just so you know it can take up to 6 weeks for a meter change to show on the national database ecoes you should factor this in when switching too. If you need any further help don’t hesitate to ask.

    #1833
    Kunal
    Participant

    Hi Guys,

    After reading the above, I’m still a bit confused. Eon have just fitted an Economy 10 meter for me after coming off their RHT tariff. If I was to switch to Together energy, would I get 10 hours off peak over 24 hours at their Economy 7 rates or would I just get 7 hours off peak due to them not having an Economy 10 tariff.

    Thanks
    Kunal

    #1832
    AndyT
    Participant

    Mark
    Thank you for your great work on this information.

    Kind regards
    AndyT

    #1831
    Paul
    Participant

    I see that Mark is asking for contributions to help with his running of his site. The amount of work he does, contacting the electricity suppliers, and collating the various prices which helps all of us find a cheaper deal, is a time consuming pastime, along with associated costs. I think users of Mark’s site should contribute to his expenses, after all we could be saving many pounds! I have contributed £12 so far. By the way I have no connection with Mark at all, just a very happy user of his site.
    Paul.

    #1830
    Paul
    Participant

    Judging by the number of feedbacks you are receiving, soon Economy 10.com will be a force to reckoned with in the electric supply industry. Well done.
    Paul

    #1829

    You’ve got it right, in a nutshell Martin. There are only two rates commonly called a Day rate and a Night rate. An E7 meter records just two periods per day (Day and Night) and an E10 meter records 3 Day rates and 3 Night rates per day – in my case Night rates are 00:00 hrs – 05:00 hrs, 13:00 hrs – 16 hrs and 20:00 hrs – 22:00 hrs (total 10 hours) with the appropriate day rates between those hours. It’s the meter that does all the switching as it’s pre-programmed, usually hard wired and it indicates which mode it’s in by displaying the reading and the reading number (e.g. 1=Day rate, 2=Night Rate). I live in a block of flats and we have 34 E10 meters in the utility room but they don’t all switch say at 13:00 hrs for the afternoon cheap rate. Rather the switch over times are staggered to avoid electricity surges at the switch over time. This is achieved by deliberately making each meter clock slightly fast or slow, e.g. mine actually switches on to the afternoon rate at 13:22 actual time i.e. my meter clock is 22 minutes slow. Bear this in mind when trying to set central heating or hot water timers to use the cheap or night rate electricity.

    #1828
    Nick
    Participant

    Martin, as I read it you can’t tell from the meter number whether it’s E7 or E10. Indeed my E10 meter is profile class2, E7. []

    Now there may be a way of telling that isn’t documented where I can find it, or another completely separate database. Someone from the industry would know. So on the face of it you probably could get a quote for an E7 tariff as your meter will come up as E7. However you’d almost certainly be breaking Ts & Cs by knowingly giving false information and could end up in hot water. Or cold when they cut you off.

    #1827
    Tim
    Participant

    Martin,
    I had the same experience after noticing the IRESA tariff, and wondering why they just couldn’t provide a peak and off peak tariff and use my existing Economy 10 meter. After a long time on hold (c.30mins) (I assume this is their lean business model in order to offer lower rates) I was told they wouldn’t offer it for Economy 10 but I could have the E7 tariff and they would arrange for the installation of a new E7 meter. E10 times suit me better so I did not pursue it any further.
    I wouldn’t surprise me if they did allow E10 meters though, I got the impression the Call Centre didn’t understand the issue and just wanted to move on to other things.
    Good luck. I am still trying to find a tariff to rival IRESA which I can actually access!

    #1826
    Martin
    Participant

    Thanks Nick.

    What would happen if I went through the switch process just as if I had an E7 meter?

    I would stress that this isn’t something I would actually do, and it’s slightly irrelevant now anyway as from this afternoon the suppliers website says they’re not currently taking on new customers – but I’m interested in the mechanics of how it works.

    Best,

    Martin.

    #1825
    Nick
    Participant

    It’s down to the company. They know what sort of meter you’ve got and will quote tariffs accordingly. The may well quote an E7 tariff for an E10 meter as they come across so few E10 users, but they are also perfectly entitled to decline to quote at all.

    #1824
    Martin
    Participant

    Hi,

    Some advice please if I may.

    I have been with iSupplyEnergy for a year on E10 (probably an E7 tariff actually), but their renewal price is quite high.

    I’ve found an E7 deal with IRESA which looks good, but they’re giving me the runaround when it comes to whether they can offer me a tariff. Some people there say yes, some no.

    In my tiny little brain, it’s as simple as my meter has some preset times for high and low rates. At the end of a given period, I give those readings to the supplier. They then bill me based on those readings.

    Is there more to it than that, or does that mean that anyone who has an E7 tariff (or two rate tariff in another name) can support an E10 meter?

    Help, I’m confused!

    #1823
    Tim
    Participant

    Graham/Nick
    Thank you very much for your responses, very helpful and clear. We can move this forwards with a bit more confidence now, but being aware that as we have a Smart Meter there are some questions to ask.
    Many thanks indeed, much appreciated
    Tim

    #1822
    Nick
    Participant

    Not sure what you mean by ‘monitor’. It’s your meter which records your usage at whatever time of day, not any other device. If you’ve got an E7 meter it will switch counters once a day, if it’s E10 it will switch three times. The timings will probably be hard coded into the meter but my be controlled by radio signal. Your supplier will either add both readings together and charge you a single price, or it will charge you a lower rate for the off-peak reading. If you have an E10 meter and it has a specific E10 tariff it will most likely charge you that. If it only has one time-of use- tariff, probably called E7 but it doesn’t matter what it’s called, you will pay that no matter how many times your meter switches counters each day. That assuming they will supply you with an E10 meter.

    But, and it’s a big but, if you have a smart meter you need to know exactly what it is set up to do, and only your supplier will know that. And remember, they can change what it does remotely any time they like.

    #1821
    GrahamW
    Participant

    Tim,

    I can comment on my experience with OVO. I was previously with Scottish & Southern on Economy 10 and had one of their dual reading meters installed. I have now swapped to OVO (because of price and customer service issues) and they treat my Economy 10 as if it is Economy 7. Which means that I get 10 hours of off-peak electricity, as before, but are charged by them as if it is Economy 7. There’s no other way that they could do this as it would involve installing a new meter, which they won’t do. They don’t have access to the inner workings of the old S&S meter and are content to stay with the S&S scheduling of peak vs off peak hours.

    #1820
    Tim
    Participant

    We are still having a number of frustrations with suppliers not offering Economy 10 (when they appear to above) or being unsure themselves.

    I wondered if you could shed any light on the ability to use an Economy 7 tariff provided by suppliers. These seem much more widespread but we have been provided differing information from slightly confused sales staff. As an existing Economy 10 user with a smart meter, if we transferred to an Economy 7 tariff would this:

    a) Represent a two part tariff which our monitor would continue to run as currently (we have been told it is our monitor that determines on peak/off peak timings), so effectively remain as Economy 10.
    b) Result in a transfer to Economy 7 timings (ie lose 3 off peak hours)
    c) Something else we’ve missed?!

    We are new to this and haven’t found suppliers (in general) very helpful or aware, so we are very grateful to have found your website and assistance. Many thanks.

    #1819

    Your meter is the regulator. It determines the hours of cheap rate (which if you have an Economy 10 meter installed will be the standard e10 times) and simply gives a reading: ‘peak’ and off-peak’ matching these.

    Therefore, if you switch to economy 7 tariff on your economy 10 meter, you provide your readings and these simply translate to ‘day’ and ‘night’ for the e7 tariff. The only thing that happens when you change supplier, pretty much, is virtually nothing. Your electricity stays the same and you simply provide your meter readings to a new supplier, who make the relevant calculations and bill you accordingly (in a nutshell).

    So, my guess, and it is a guess, is yes, I expect you could just complete the switch online without speaking to them. I would suggest calling them beforehand to ensure it is all ‘above board’ (although they have confirmed and provided this to me/neighbour already and told me to simply switch as if economy 7 previously). So, either way, if one method of switching proves unsuccessful you can always try the other (although this may be more time consuming). Should you wish to call them their contact number can be easily found by typing ‘scottish power phone number’ into google. I have never had problems verifying they are able to supply me through talking to customer service, as described above.

    Good luck with your switch! I’ll be getting on with mine as soon as able to. Let us know how it goes.

    #1818
    Angie
    Participant

    My next comments may sound any of the following: stupid/ untutored/niaive.. Any could be valid!

    I’ve gone onto the Uswitch website and ticked the box for having Economy 7 at my (shown) address (this leads me to believe my MPAN no is now correct on thenational database). If I tick one more box it seems it will let me change to Scottish Power Economy 7 Rates – fixed until December 2017. []

    Andrew, I think you seem to be the one to give me the answer…. Is this stupid? I simply do not understand if switches need to be flicked/depressed somewhere to supply me with 10 hours cheap rate, or would my installed metre be the “regulator” to ensure I have 10, not 7, hours cheap electricity daily. To clarify, is this action feasible without speaking to SP? Might/will I achieve the exchange to Scottish Power by this online process ? And, NB, the online December rates are below the verbal version! Thanks to you all for your patience.

    #1817
    Sjh

    The hours are set by the meter and cannot be changed so you still get the Economy 10 hours but at the Economy 7 prices

    #1816
    MKing
    Participant

    You get 10 hours on the E7 tariff unless the system is untypical and we currently use iSupply on this system on a single “E10” programmed meter. Usually only the larger suppliers will change or re-programme a meter. We use a system of timers to vary the use within the 10 hours for water etc. and it is quite convenient as opposed to the standard 7 hours in a block where you get warmth-a-plenty for breakfast and nothing by 10pm….

    #1815

    Hi all, have been reading with interest about using an E7 tariff with E10 meter. Do I still get my 10 hours of cheap rate electric, or do I changed to E7 times?

    #1814

    Thought I’d weigh in with the latest information I’ve found. I had a new heating system installed by my landlord (housing association) last year, and due to my work pattern have been using it on a standard economy 10 tariff. However now that my work pattern has changed, and winter is coming, I am in the process of switching so have been reviewing this extensively for the fast few weeks. I thought I’d post what I’ve found recently since there haven’t been any updates recently (btw I’ve found this site EXTREMELY useful, and the only one of its kind). []

    I’ve found many electricity companies will indeed supply an Economy 7 tariff using a pre-existing Economy 10 meter, essentially offering you an extra 3 hours off-peak usage on a standard economy 7 tariff. To clarify, this will mean you are provided with standard economy 10 times, using the peak and off-peak charges for the standard economy 7 tariff, which generally works out much cheaper. These companies will generally not be able to install an Economy 10 meter if needed (as I do) – and will only be able to provide supply an existing meter that has already been fitted. The other companies provide a dedicated Economy 10 tariff and will also install a meter for you if required. Some companies charge for this.

    To get around this, I am switching to EDF to begin with, and then plan to switch back to Scottish Power if they are able to supply their economy 7 tariff using my new (economy 10) meter. If this is not possible I will go with the next cheapest provider. EDF are the only company I’ve found that will install a new meter free of charge, and do not charge an exit fee to leave their tariff. Although some may find the ethics of this questionable, there is therefore no rule to prevent you following these steps to set yourself up with a new meter, then switching to a cheaper tariff with another provider. The meter they provide has the economy 10 charging periods built into it, so it is the meter itself which bills you correctly for each charging period. This will result in two rates (peak and off-peak) with off-peak times (for my area) set to: 12am-5am // 1pm-4pm // 8pm-10pm. Therefore, switching to another company on a standard economy 7 tariff, if allowed, will still provide you with two rates – only with 3 extra hours of off-peak usage, potentially generating great savings compared to Economy 10 tariffs (which are usually more expensive).

    []

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 27 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.